3 Easy Hikes Near Puerto Vallarta

After sipping on some 2 for 80 pesos margaritas and eating my fair share of street food in Puerto Vallarta, I was eager to find some decent hikes in the area.

From easiest to most difficult (which still doesn't classify as difficult), here are my picks for 3 easy hikes near Puerto Vallarta:

Mirador de La Cruz

Mirador de La Cruz is a popular viewpoint of Puerto Vallarta. Located about a 20-30 minute walk up a hill by the Malecon, it’s great for those not looking to leave the city center.

While I ran out of time to try this hike myself, my friendly Airbnb host promised it’s worth the climb and very doable.

For a taste of what the hike is like and what to expect at the top, check out this YouTube video.

Yelapa Waterfall

The waterfall in Yelapa towards the end of the rainy season

The waterfall in Yelapa towards the end of the rainy season

Yelapa is a little beach town south of Puerto Vallarta which can only be reached by boat. It’s pretty touristy and doesn’t offer a whole lot to do besides laying on the beach.

If you’re willing to get your feet wet though, there’s a waterfall you can check out less than 30 minutes away.

GETTING TO YELAPA

Posing with an Iguana in Yelapa, Mexico

Posing with an Iguana in Yelapa, Mexico

From the center of Puerto Vallarta, there are two ways to get to Yelapa. You can take a water taxi directly from the pier along the Malecon, or you can first take a bus to Boca de Tomatlan and take a water taxi from there.

If you’re not a fan of long, bumpy boat rides or are looking to save money, take the bus to Boca first.

Bus to boca de tomatan

The buses to Boca de Tomatlan are orange and white, and pick up riders by the Oxxo at the corner of Constitucion and Basilio Badillo. Buses leave every 5 minutes, so don’t worry if you see one leave right as you arrive.

When I traveled to Yelapa, I chose to ride the bus to Boca first because it was INSANELY cheap. For only 8 pesos, I could sit back, relax, and watch the jungle go by.

Water taxi

Water taxis and local boats in Boca de Tomatlan

Water taxis and local boats in Boca de Tomatlan

From Boca de Tomatlan, the water taxi costs 180 pesos round trip to Yelapa and back. While still a bit pricey, taking a water taxi directly from Puerto Vallarta costs 320 pesos round trip.

Tickets are almost always sold as a duo too unless you can convince the driver to let you pay on the boat. This means if you decide to take the water taxi from Puerto Vallarta to Yelapa, don’t count on being able able to take the water taxi from Yelapa to Boca de Tomatlan on the way back.

One last thing to keep in mind, the final water taxi from Yelapa directly to Puerto Vallarta leaves Yelapa at around 4 PM. The last water taxi from Yelapa to Boca leaves Yelapa at 6 PM.

FINDING THE WATERFALL

Crossing the river on our Yelapa waterfall hike

Crossing the river on our Yelapa waterfall hike

Once in Yelapa, you’ll have to wade across the river on the backside of the beach. The water here is pretty shallow though, and never got higher than my knees.

Across the river is a clear path into town. Follow it and keep your eyes peeled for signs to ‘la cascada.’ While it’s a pretty straight shot from here, don’t be afraid to ask locals to point you in the right direction.

Boca de Tomatlan to Las Animas

Stopping to enjoy the view at the beginning of our hike from Boca de Tomatlan to Las Animas

Stopping to enjoy the view at the beginning of our hike from Boca de Tomatlan to Las Animas

**Please see directions on how to get to Boca above

This hike is a bit of sore spot for my friend and I.

When we arrived in Boca, a local told us Las Animas was a short 45 minute to an hour long hike. Neither of us had hiking shoes on, but we assumed the trail would be pretty flat (what’s a 45 minute ‘hike’ in flip flops right)?

Boy were we in for it…

Hiking to Las Animas from Boca de Tomatlan took us two and a half hours. Which, in normal circumstances would’ve been fine, however, one of my sandals broke halfway and we’d held off on having lunch so we could eat in Las Animas.

Looking back though, it was a beautiful trail and something I highly recommend doing if you have the chance - just make sure to eat first and wear proper shoes.

COLOMITOS COVE

 Swimming at Colomitos Cove on the way to Las Animas

 Swimming at Colomitos Cove on the way to Las Animas

At the halfway point to Las Animas, you’ll find Colomitos Cove. This little patch of sand was clean, secluded, and the perfect place to stop and rest for a bit.

LAS ANIMAS

Once in Las Animas, there’s a couple of different restaurant options. The prices are a bit more expensive here since the location is remote, but I recommend trying the Red Snapper if you see it on the menu. Yuting and I ordered one and it was one of the best things we ate in Mexico.

Make sure to plan your time carefully though, as the last water taxi back to Boca runs at 6 PM.

 

Happy Hiking!

Please comment below with any thoughts or questions